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How could a car accident affect your ability to see?

| Jun 20, 2019 | Uncategorized |

What does a car accident have to do with your ability to see? Of course, some sort of debris could get into your eye and cause you to have vision problems, at least temporarily; however, that is not the focus of this article. Here, the discussion will center on how a concussion, or traumatic brain injury, can give you vision problems that could last for an appreciable amount of time.

The basics of a concussion

A concussion is a type of TBI caused by a blow to your head. In a car accident, the impact causes your brain to move violently back and forth and/or side to side in your head. This violent motion can cause all of the cells in your brain to fire at once, create chemical changes in your brain and kill brain cells. Even if you do not experience any structural damage to your brain, a concussion could compromise its function, even temporarily. 

The blow does not have to be severe in order to cause you lifelong issues. Even if you believe you escaped the accident without injury right after it happens, symptoms of a TBI could appear in the days or weeks following. For this reason, you should always see a doctor after a car accident. 

The relationship between a TBI and your vision

The effects of a TBI can last for weeks, months or longer, even if imaging scans do not show anything significant. If you experienced the following symptoms as part of your TBI, you could be at risk to suffer from vision problems:

  • Dizziness
  • Eye-coordination issues
  • Blurred vision
  • Headaches
  • Double vision
  • Problems focusing
  • Problems with your gait or walk
  • Trouble shifting focus from near to far and vice versa
  • Sensitivity to light
  • Problems tracking movement
  • Prolonged visual processing

With a severe concussion, one could experience temporary or permanent blindness. Many of the above symptoms can resolve over time, while others may linger for months, years or longer.

The need for support

You will more than likely need medical care for at least a while due to a TBI.

In fact, you may not be able to work due to your vision issues and TBI. If you believe the accident was the fault of the other party, then you could pursue compensation for these  financial losses and the other damages  you have or will incur as a result of the accident.