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How can a concussion cause hearing loss?

| Mar 1, 2019 | Catastrophic Injuries |

You may think the biggest concern when you get a concussion is the chance of a brain injury, but that is not all that could result. According to Everyday Health, there is also the possibility of temporary and permanent hearing loss. You could also have hearing damage that makes it hard to hear, causes tinnitus or leads to other hearing issues that affect your daily life.

The ear is a fairly fragile structure. You have very small bones within your ear that could suffer when you get a concussion. If these bones break or dislocate, it affects your hearing. In addition, when you get a concussion, it could damage the auditory pathway that goes to your brain and enables the signals that allow you to hear. Your eardrum may rupture, which could cause short- or long-term issues. In addition, the cochlear nerve or various parts of the inner ear may suffer damage that is irreversible.

Typically, a concussion occurs due to a hard hit to the head. If this is what causes your concussion, then you should pay attention to your hearing. This is especially true if the blow to your head was near one of your ears. You should get your hearing and your ear’s inner structures checked for damage.

You may be more focused on your head injury after a concussion and not completely aware of a hearing issue right away unless you suffer severe hearing loss. That is why you should be aware that a concussion may be coupled with hearing loss and get completely checked out after your incident. This information is for education. It is not legal advice.