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Image from an actual HMN case, reproduced with permission

The three types of distracted driving

| Aug 24, 2017 | Motor Vehicle Accidents |

While most drivers in California have heard about how dangerous distracted driving is, there are many who still do not understand exactly what qualifies as a distraction. If you are in this group, you may be surprised to realize that distractions can fall into one of three categories or be a combination of multiple types. We at Hildebrand, McLeod and Nelson have created this guide to detail what these types are. 

According to EndDistractedDriving.org, averting your eyes from the road for any reason can be considered a visual distraction. This can occur if you simply look on the floor of your car to find something that fell or stare at something you as you pass. Removing your eyes from the road in front of you can prevent you from seeing oncoming dangers and can lead to an accident.

Manual distractions are also dangerous. This category applies any time you take one or both hands off the wheel. Reaching for a drink, changing radio stations, handing something to a child in the back seat or rolling down a window can all fall into this category of distracted driving.

One type of distraction that is not as well-known is cognitive. You can have both hands on the wheel and both eyes on the road and still be guilty of distracted driving if you are not focused on operating the vehicle. Texting is a combination of all three categories, which is why it is known as one of the most dangerous distractions. For more information on this topic, please visit our web page.